Keycaps-exchange

Faulty keyboard?

    Your keyboard is defective, e.g. after a fluid damage? You can't find a replacement in the appropriate language because there is currently no keyboard available, e.g. in German? Then you have the possibility to buy a keyboard suitable for your model in any other language and simply use the keycaps of your old keyboard to convert the keyboard in another language into e.g. a German keyboard. All languages except the English keyboard with US assignment can be used for this purpose, provided that the key mechanics used fit together. US keyboards are not usable, because the key shapes of e.g. the return key do not match.

   To turn a Swedish keyboard into a German keyboard, for example, only 13 keys need to be swapped:

    schwedish keyboardgerman keyboard

What you need to pay attention to

It is important that the key mechanics used match. Between 2008 and 2015 Apple used four different types of key mechanics. To find out which type was used on your keyboard, you need to lift the cap of a letter key. This is not really complicated, you only need a flat spatula and a standard thumb, the latter usually found on both hands (one for each hand). Fingernails are also useful here. Using the spatula, lift the key slightly from underneath, grab the key cap with your fingernail and pull it back up with a quick jerk. Important: Do not lift it very slowly, the danger that one of the small holders of the mechanism will break is higher if you do it slowly. Don't be afraid of a quick jerk: You have plenty of spare mechanics in the new keyboard. But it's best to practice with keys that you don't have to change, so you always have a spare key! You can find a short video on our Youtube channel.
lift key 1
Lift the key cap with the spudger...
lift key 2
...thumbnail underneath and with fast...
lift key 3
...jerk to the top back and click out.

The four types of key-mechanics

    The key-mechanics are offered with different names, here are some explanations

Type E - AP02

    Used in MacBook Airs, MacBook unibody, and MacBook Pro unibody from 2008, MacBook Airs from Mid 2010 onwards used type J or K (see below).

Keycap Typ E - AP02
Keycap Typ E - AP02
Keycap Typ E - AP02
Keycap Typ E - AP02
Type G - AP04

    As of 2008 used in MacBook unibody and MacBook Pro unibody as an alternative to type E above.

Keycap Typ G - AP04
Keycap Typ G - AP04
Keycap Typ G - AP04
Keycap Typ G - AP04
Type J - AP08 - AC06

    Used in the 11-inch and 13-inch MacBook Airs in 2010 and later in the 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro Retina in 2012.

Keycap Type J - AP08 - AC06
Keycap Type J - AP08 - AC06
Keycap Type J - AP08 - AC06
Keycap Type J - AP08 - AC06
Type K - AP11 - AC07

   Used in the 11-inch and 13-inch MacBook Airs starting in 2012, and in the 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro Retina starting in 2012.

Keycap Type K - AP11 - AC07
Keycap Type K - AP11 - AC07
Keycap Type K - AP11 - AC07
Keycap Type K - AP11 - AC07

To place another keycap in the free space, simply put it on and press firmly, the cap will easily click back in.